Steve Jelliss, Mazda fleet and remarketing director, explains how Mazda's new fuel and CO2 emission reducing SKYACTIV technology will benefit business car managers and company car drivers
Jelliss: SKYACTIV benefits
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Steve Jelliss, Mazda fleet and remarketing director, explains how Mazda's new fuel and CO2 emission reducing SKYACTIV technology will benefit business car managers and company car drivers
Jelliss: SKYACTIV benefits

BREAKTHROUGH technology – that’s how Mazda is talking about SKYACTIV, new technology that will deliver major fuel savings and emission reductions for business company car fleets with no compromise in driving dynamics. And it’s arriving in early 2012. But what exactly is SKYACTIV? More car jargon? Steve Jelliss, Mazda fleet and remarketing director, explains all.

 

 

MAZDA’S SKYACTIV technology encompasses industry-leading developments that focus on new generation petrol and diesel engines, as you might expect. But it’s not just engines. SKYACTIV includes improved aerodynamics, vehicle weight reduction, along with new chassis and transmission developments for Mazda cars.

What does that mean for business car managers and company car drivers? Simply, the technology translates into reduced whole life costs, lower fuel bills and company car tax savings.

SKYACTIV technology offers:

New generation SKYACTIV-G petrol engine efficiency that delivers a 15% increase in fuel economy and torque (the ‘G’ is for gasoline, by the way);

The introduction of new SKYACTIV-D diesel engine technology that delivers a 20% fuel economy improvement thanks to the world’s lowest diesel-engine compression ratio;

The introduction of a new six-speed automatic transmission available on both petrol and diesel and a new lightweight compact six-speed manual transmission – both promise fuel economy and lower emission improvements;

An all-new platform providing highly rigid body and chassis that achieves outstanding crash safety performance while being 100 kilos lighter than its predecessor.

There are other benefits, too. The low compression ratio diesel technology also allows Mazda to meet Euro6 emission regulations without expensive NOx (Nitrogen Oxides) after treatment systems.

A number of influential motor industry commentators have already driven SKYACTIV-equipped Mazdas including Martin Ward, manufacturer relationship manager at automotive information provider CAP. After driving four different SKYACTIV cars, Martin said:

“Mazda proved beyond any doubt just how good SKYACTIV is – especially the diesel automatic. It is a brilliant piece of engineering. With the technology debuting in the CX-5, Mazda has a winner on its hands. The technology should help Mazda in its quest to improve fleet sales. Mazda is definitely a brand to watch.”

Crucially SKYACTIV allows us to defy current industry thinking that significant fuel economy and emission breakthroughs can only be achieved with alternative technology.

Research tells us that only 10% of new cars sold in 2020 will be fully electric. So we believe that the strategy we are pursuing is the right one – first launching breakthrough technologies for gasoline and diesel engines while continuing to work on hybrid and electric vehicles as well as hydrogen-powered models.

Business car managers, SME fleets and company car drivers will be able to sample the full range of SKYACTIV technology for the first time on Mazda’s all-new compact crossover SUV, the CX-5. This is scheduled to launch at the beginning of 2012 with best-in-class sub-120g/km CO2 emissions.

The CX-5 will be seen for the first time at September’s Frankfurt International Motor Show.

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